Walking London’s Lost Rivers – The Tyburn (4K) – London Videos



A walk along the course of one of the lost Rivers of London – The Tyburn. This buried river flows from Hampstead through Swiss Cottage and Regent’s Park, along Marylebone Lane, through Mayfair and Green Park beneath Buckingham Palace where it splits into channels and we follow it as it joins the Tachbrook to make its confluence with the Thames near Vauxhall Bridge.

Related links and info:
Interview with Rainbow George https://vimeo.com/129457246

Google map of the route of the walk along the Tyburn (with a few errors where there are extra lines) https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sDF3_Jtg29UlaXakNKnEGTXbrRQOnSCZ&usp=sharing

Shot in 4K on a Panasonic GX80 (affiliate link) https://amzn.to/2QUrtXo

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Music:
Ambiment – The Ambient by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100630
Artist: http://incompetech.com/

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44 Comments - Write a Comment

  1. Fantastic! I can have a walk through London with an expert guide from my cozy desk located in the coastal grasslands of Texas, between Victoria and Goliad. Cheers… fascinating!

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  2. As always, so interesting. Excuse my ignorance, but I'd be surprised if there isn't something published that has maps of rivers and roads etc that overlay each other.

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  3. This is quoted from another online blog site: –
    "Charlbert Street bridge across the Regent’s Canal is designed as such for both aesthetic and practical purposes. Its gracious curves belie the fact it was originally designed to accommodate the course of the Tyburn river (as a bricked in underground course) and it means that the Tyburn itself approaches the bridge at a curve, gradually smoothing into a straight section across the middle part of the bridge before curving away once again".

    This apparently changed in the mid 1800's

    So. . . today!

    "The ‘Tyburn’ definitely goes under the Regents Canal near the A41 Park Road bridge these days, and then passing beneath that road all the way to Baker Street, not once touching Regent’s Park.
    It is most ironic some bloggers claim the Tyburn passes across Charlbert St bridge when other bloggers have publicized maps of London’s sewers clearly showing the ‘Tyburn’ (aka the KSPS) flow as being via the Park Road route! That is, not over the canal at that point but underneath it!"

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  4. Great video John. As soon as you said the word 'riverine' I thought of Apocalypse Now: you are on a solo voyage along a river while other people on their own journeys intersect yours, and the river ends in a palace and a place of execution. Oh, and you also had a nod to 'Purple Haze' with the Hendrix reference.

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  5. Another visitor from David Johns here 🙂 Excellent stuff and very glad I came. Looking forward to watching your back catalogue and your upcoming episodes.

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  6. Great video John, David’s the reason I’m now following you.

    The Us ambassador’s is actually on the edge of the park.

    I love walking the regents canal, I’m scratching my head thinking I have seen reference to Tyburn here some where!

    Regards Nigel

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  7. Thank you John a nice long walk/Video for the new year i love it

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  8. Fascinating as ever. I do wish the local authorities would plot these hidden rivers with the occasional marker.

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  9. Aaaah wonderful London. I worked in Belsize Park in the early 90s. That was a fascinating look at the underground rivers – thank you again for taking us with you. Love the views and the history.

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  10. Careful John, many more quality programs such as this and you will end up killing off T.V for ever.

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  11. it is amazing to me how much the places i've lived in the united states, look just like what you are walking through, in England~ however, i have seen nothing to compare with the boat @9:46 , both in St. Louis and in Cleveland Heights, Ohio…it's as if , an exact replica of England had been made.

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  12. A very nice and pleasant walk. I'm from Sweden and love London. I've walked Regent's Canal, starting in The Grapes in Narrow Street and ending up in Regent's Park, rather worse for wear. There are many pubs to visit on a hot day.

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  13. The area around Marlebourne still looks like the London I knew 50 years ago.

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  14. Can you do a walk through Chesterfield and some of its small hidden walkways?

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  15. By regents park you can here it rushing under the road if its quiet and definately here it by the drainage holes on the road if im correct it feeds the lake in the park too

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  16. Watching this while also following the path using google maps.

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  17. Hello John, when I walked the Tyburn (Feb 2018) I found the Basement 'Tyburn' on South Molton Lane, where you find Davies Mews slightly off to the right – In the Mews section of Gray's Antique Market. This is unlikely to be the actual river/sewer, but connected to the same groundwater springs – it has to be quite pure as it contains koi carp and is open topped – a sight to behold! Thanks for another amazing walk.
    My reference material was Tom Bolton – London's Lost Rivers – A Walkers Guide.
     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grays_Antique_Centre

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  18. Another classic, John. These river walks are an excellent idea & this one turned into a night walk, too. Enjoyed the little 'sustenance on the go' interludes. A subject for a future chapbook, perhaps?

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  19. Thank you John for another fascinating video.A great way to start off the new year. Looking forward to your other river walks that you have planned

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  20. The house with the turret on Fitzjohns Avenue,amazing video John, Happy New Year…..sorry to hear about the 14 year old boy attacked and killed in Woking, very sad ….I binge read all the Rivers of London books last year,Tyburn is after the Thames one of the most complex and powerful characters…..You planning a New River walk to the ending at Roseberry Avenue/Sadlers Wells sometime ????

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  21. AT THE SOUTH END ON THE WEST RIVER SIDE OF VAUXHALL BRIDGE, 190G, IS A HUGE, TALL CAST IRON FIGURE OF A LADY HOLDING A MODEL OF ST PAULS CATHEDRAL !!!.

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  22. Great start to the new year John. I wish you could do a walk every day. Keep them coming.

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  23. You could easily plot the river's "former" route on GPS and walk it to see how close you are & where it is / was. A great vid.

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  24. Wot, no pies John? Sarnies, a ciabatta, but no pies!

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  25. Another fascinating walk! Hampstead is one of my favourite parts of London and I also was excited to see the HMV record shop because I had a summer job there in about 1970 while I was at University – in fact I think I was two summers there. I worked in the classical department downstairs and customers could hear records (I think this was even before cassettes came in!) before buying them, in listening booths. Quite a few famous people came in the store and I remember once telling off Andre Previn (without knowing who it was) for putting a pile of records on the hot glass counter above one of the record players. Another time I had a phone query from a lady with a rather characteristic voice – when I asked her name, it turned out to be Glynis Johns, who was more famous then than now probably. We also had a customer – an older man – who looked exactly like Tchaikovsky. Some of the other assistants would call out 'Look, Tchaikovsky's back!' when he turned up – which he must have heard, but he didn't react. And again I had customers who would say – I'm looking for a piece that goes la la la lalalala la…..la! do you stock it? Oops, I'm rambling – John, you always seem to trigger happy memories even looking for a hidden river! Amazing!

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  26. Another great video. This is a link that explains that the Tyburn goes under the Regents Canal near the A41 Park Road bridge. https://www.hydeparknow.uk/2016/02/10/tyburn-myth-demolished/

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  27. Grays Antiques. Its definitely there. I think they may have been lying .

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  28. I'm here thanks to David Cruising the cut. Mews a small street lined with former stables that have been converted into housing. Wish you had started the walk earlier :-). Great video.

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  29. ‘Meandering riverine vibe’…a truely wonderful walk John, so much info and juicy facts.. Rather strange to see you outside Buckingham palace.

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  30. It was Barbara huttons house John the heiress of Woolworths no less amazing story John of her life worth a read _poor little rich girl sorry can't remember the author x

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  31. Great vlog to start the year. Thanks for sharing SMILES

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  32. A magnificent evening walk following the Tyburn. The twilight seemed magical for you John. I'm curious why so many rivers were piped up underground. It seems to me, at least in this day and age we've lost so much of what could be described as the charm a small brook or stream brings along it path. Happy New Year.

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  33. Thank you for the info about Ben Aaronovich’s London River books. I needed a book recommendation.

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  34. Thank you John for yet another very very interesting Video of London.
    Lyn and I always feel quite relaxed and you make us feel like we are actually there.
    Kind regards
    Dave and Lyn ….. from Australia.

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  35. Thank you Mr. Rogers,as interesting as ever. In the early/mid 1960`s I worked for a firm of "casemakers" & export packers in the day`s when stuff was put in wooden crates & loaded onto ship`s.
    We had a small branch to serve the London auction houses & dealers.We were located in "Haunch Of Venison Yard" that linked Upper Brook Street to South Moulton Street.The timber was stored in the basement that was always damp,& on occasion got flooded . Watching your film leads me to the conclusion that The Tyburn might have been the culprit?
    Some years later I worked at 152 Fleet Street,a few doors down from "Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese" pub, & we had the same flooding issue in the basement.The River Fleet perhaps?

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  36. @23:50 – I went to that cafe last Friday and sat in that exact same seat in the back corner! How odd! Great video as always by the way..

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  37. Thanks again for another informative video John. I always glean a lot of information from your films. Bob.

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  38. I really enjoyed that, John. It brightened up my day no end.

    Would love to hear more about Rainbow George and Peter Cook. As he might of said, no doubt some of it is "pure gold".

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  39. Destined to be a royal river John. I enjoyed that especially the discovery of the Walbrook sign. All buried in our midst. Great stuff! I Look forward to your river walks – I have a few this year to. All the best Mark.

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  40. Another very informative video John.As someone who has only visited tourist sites whilst visiting London it is always interesting to see other areas of the city.

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  41. Fantastic, as always. The wonderful magical buried veins and arteries of London. Thanks John.

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